All Tours: 58

Chinese immigrants came to Idaho in the mid to late 19th century. At its peak, the Chinese people made up 30% of Idaho’s population. Working as railroad workers, miners, farmers, merchants, and more,…
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Considered the largest privately-owned university in the United States, Brigham Young University offers a unique experience and a rich history. Founded in 1875 as an academy for students of all ages,…
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Utah is primarily known as the headquarters and cultural hearth of Mormonism, or the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. However, some of Utah’s earliest roots center around its established…
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The historic Greek Orthodox Church located in Salt Lake City, the Holy Trinity, was filled with Greek adults and youth on Friday night for a social dance. The minister of the church greeted couples as…
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From 1945 to 1993, over one thousand atomic weapons were detonated as part of the United States Nuclear Testing Program. In the years between 1951 and 1962, these tests were performed above ground at…
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Congress passed the first Homestead Act in 1862. It opened millions of acres for Americans to settle outside of cities. The plots were generally 160 acres, and the opportunities west of the…
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Perhaps the first two characteristics that come to mind when someone mentions Utah are “Mormons” and “the great outdoors.” Although Alaska and California are tied for the most national parks (with…
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Beneath the serene landscape of southern Colorado’s arid foothill country are the remnants of two forgotten worlds. Far beneath it all are the remains of prehistoric plants and animals, decayed and…
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The Intermountain West region has long had a connection with cinema, especially that of science fiction. From alien planets to mysterious military bases to the stomping grounds of radioactive…
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A historic house museum is exactly what its title says – a house that has been turned into a museum. They often contain the inhabitants’ belongings displayed in a way that reflects their original…
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Explore the history of Fort Bridger, one of the main stops on the Overland Trail. Beginning as a trade post for the fur trade, and later an important stop for migrants heading west, Fort Bridger has…
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Virginia City put Nevada on the map for one of the greatest silver deposits found in American history. The silver mines brought men and women from all walks of life. This tour highlights the variety…
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In the decades-long fight for women’s suffrage, the territories and states in the Intermountain West were some of the first places in the United States where women won the right to vote. Women in the…
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National Parks were created, in part, to protect land and resources from development and business interests. In the process of creating them, however, American Indians who lived in park areas were…
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In early 1900’s Nevada maintained a wild west reputation through its liberal divorce laws. Reno served as America’s center for divorce for more than half of the 20th century. Many accounts of those…
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Brigadier General George R. Crook (September 8, 1830-March 21, 1890) is popularly recognized as the quintessential 'Indian Fighter' of the late nineteenth century. He frequented the entire…
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Salt Lake City’s Temple Square is more than just a place of worship, it is the administrative center of a major world religion. What began as an open-air gathering place has become an architectural…
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Utah is home to people from all over the world. From those who came as refugees to those who came willfully, Utah is a melting pot of cultures that from time to time established themselves in…
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Beginning in 1862, the Homestead Act gave any head of household over the age of 21 the right to homestead federal land. After proving up (colloquial phrase for the legal process of securing title to…
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The iconic Rocky Mountains stretch a total of around 3,000 miles from New Mexico to the south to the Canadian provinces Alberta and British Columbia to the North. Some of the country’s most iconic…
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In the late-nineteenth-century Intermountain West, crisis befell members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Family members went into hiding, separated from one another by hundreds,…
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In 1911-12 Emery and Ellsworth Kolb rafted the Grand, Green, and Colorado Rivers from Wyoming to California. They owned a photography studio at Bright Angel in the Grand Canyon and the expedition used…
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In the second half of the twentieth century, after World War II, American tourism to national parks surged. With the National Park Service’s hundredth anniversary fast-approaching in 1966, the U.S.…
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This tour explores the significance and history of fossil sites in the Intermountain West. It includes sites such as Fossil Cabin, Petrified Forest National Park, Dinosaur National Monument, Dinosaur…
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After evolutionarily originating in the Americas, camels returned to the American West as pack animals in a U.S. military experiment as well as a series of transportation enterprises. These exotic…
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Town boosters were citizens with visions for improving their cities and increasing commerce. With regular travelers and increased rail traffic, pioneers of rail towns saw opportunities to profit off…
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Since the nineteenth century, mining has provided significant economic support to the Intermountain West and to the United States overall. Copper supported wars, coal fueled power plants, and silver…
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The United States federal government claims public ownership of vast amounts of land in the Intermountain West. As Americans became interested in preserving natural environments in the twentieth…
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The Colorado River can be a challenge to cross, especially in regions of rugged desert, deep canyon walls, and swift waters. These four stories highlight historical and contemporary crossing points.
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The Rocky Mountain Rendezvous were annual meetings organized by fur trade companies between 1825–1840. Fur trappers gathered at these summertime rendezvous to sell their furs, purchase supplies from…
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Women fought long and hard for their right to suffrage, or legal voting, in the United States. For centuries, men in America and in Europe before had tied women’s value to being submissive, raising…
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The land of Utah was home to multiple Indigenous bands and tribes, such as the Paiute, Shoshone, and Ute tribes for thousands of years before Europeans came to the Americas. Historians believe that a…
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The 1930s saw an enormous economic downturn in the United States with the Great Depression. Unemployment numbers ran high and artists were among the many who found difficulty seeking employment. To…
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A series of stories detailing projects of the New Deal Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) in western National Monuments and National Park.
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Since the mid-nineteenth century, immigrants from all over the world have flocked to the Intermountain West looking for economic opportunity and the chance of a better life. Unfortunately for many of…
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In 1943, what had once been a quiet Ranch School for young boys underwent a transformation, evolving into a top-secret national laboratory with a singular mission: developing a weapon of mass…
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During the 1940s, thousands of Utahans left to fight in the largest war the United States had ever been involved in. While those back home didn’t see combat directly, they did what they could to…
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Driving through Eastern Idaho, you pass what seems like an endless stretch of large green farms, often with massive sprinklers spreading thousands of gallons of water over dozens of different types of…
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