Sites of Religious Diversity in Utah

Though best-known for its Latter-day Saint population, Utah is home to diverse religious communities. Locations explored in this tour are centered in Salt Lake City and Ogden, former railroad hubs and often the first site of settlement for these communities. Religious diversity adds to the beauty and depth of the Beehive State; each religious group seeks to contribute to Utah's history and welfare.

Cemetery B’nai Israel is a burial ground dedicated to followers of the Reform branch of Judaism. Located in the sloping Avenues of Salt Lake City, this space is a beautiful resting place for some of Utah’s most famous Jewish residents.
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The Cathedral of the Madeleine, constructed in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, stands at the head of the Diocese of Salt Lake City. Featuring neo-Gothic architecture and glorious stained glass windows, the cathedral is a beautiful place to visit and worship.
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The Shaare Tzedek Cemetery is a dedicated gravesite for practicing Orthodox Jews in the Salt Lake City area. Though smaller than its sister cemeteries, B’nai Israel and Montefiore, the recently rededicated Shaare Tzedek is nonetheless a quiet and peaceful site for remembrance and service.
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Serving Conservative Jews in the Salt Lake area, the Montefiore Cemetery can be found amidst the city’s historic Avenues. Dedicated to preserving the memories of Utah’s Jewish community, the Montefiore Cemetery contains a personal memorial to those who lost their lives in the Holocaust.
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St. Mark’s Cathedral began its life as the headquarters of the Salt Lake Missionary Diocese, later becoming the base for the Diocese of Utah. Serving parishioners for over 150 years, this Gothic Revival Cathedral was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1970.
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The Buddhist Church of Ogden has traces its origins to 1912, but the city’s Japanese-American population goes even further back– to the beginnings of the transcontinental railroad.
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Nestled in the foothills of Salt Lake City, Congregation Kol Ami recently celebrated its 50th anniversary. Born of a merger between two branches of Judaism, this synagogue now serves about a quarter of Utah’s Jewish population.
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