Intermountain State Capitols and Their Early Histories

The capitol buildings of the intermountain states each speak to the unique histories of their respective states and the period of their creation. This tour encourages visitors to engage with these buildings not only as seats of government, but as historical artifacts, pieces of architecture, and aspirational statements of the people they serve.

The Colorado State Capitol in Denver

The land that would become modern Colorado was acquired by the United States in two parts. Its eastern half was part of the Louisiana Purchase, and the west was ceded by Mexico at the end of the Mexican–American War. Native tribes, including the Ute,…

The Montana State Capitol in Helena

The land that became Montana was originally the territory of Native peoples. Its current Native tribes include the Blackfeet, Assiniboine, Cheyenne, Crow, Shoshoni, Sioux, Gros Ventre, Salish, and Kootenai. A limited number of white settlers and…

The Idaho State Capitol in Boise

The land that would become Idaho was originally Native land. Today these Native tribes include the Coeur dAlene, Kootenai, Shoshone-Bannock, and Nez Perce. White settlers had been passing through along the Oregon trail earlier in the nineteenth…

The Utah State Capitol in Salt Lake City

The land that became Utah was originally the territory of Native peoples. Its modern Native tribes include the Utes, Northern Shoshone, Western Shoshone (Goshute), Navajo, and Southern Paiutes. On July 21, 1847, two advance scouts of the first of…

The Wyoming State Capitol in Cheyenne

The land that became Wyoming was originally the territory of Native peoples. Wyoming’s modern Native tribes include the Ute, Arapaho, Cheyenne, Shoshone, and Crow. The California Trail, Oregon Trail, and Mormon Trail all passed through Wyoming and…